11 Things the Writer in Your Life Wishes You Knew

Do you live with a writer? Is your roommate a poet? Is your significant other a novelist? Is your child a screenwriter, your best friend a technical writer, your brother an essayist? There are probably a few things they’re dying to tell you. Like:

11. This is a writer doing work.

Credit: desegura89, flickr.com
Credit: desegura89, flickr.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes, your writer will look like what you imagine a writer should look like, all “Look at me! I’m typing!” and stuff.

 

10. This is a writer doing work.

Credit: waferboard, flickr.com
Credit: waferboard, flickr.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Staring out a window is when thoughts happen. If it doesn’t look like your writer is doing anything, it’s because you’re not a writer.

 

9. This is a writer doing work.

Credit: Kilarin, flickr.com
Credit: Kilarin, flickr.com

Your writer isn’t napping. He’s thinking. With his eyes shut.

 

8. Writers fear this.

 

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7. But they fear this more.

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6. Characters’ emotions can be contagious.

Credit: suvodeb, flickr.com
Credit: suvodeb, flickr.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Your writer isn’t actually angry/upset/sad. One of her characters is probably angry/upset/sad.

 

5. Your writer wants to tell you this, sometimes.

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It’s not personal.

 

4. Your writer listens a little differently.

Credit: Rising Damp, flickr.com
Credit: Rising Damp, flickr.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
If your writer has ever told you that you’ve got a “gift for dialogue,” just say, “Thank you.” If he’s ever said to you, “Can you say that again? I want to write it down,” just go along with it.

 

3. Your writer compulsively re-reads things.

Credit: meddygarnet, flickr.com
Credit: meddygarnet, flickr.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Your writer re-reads everything, from text messages to emails to grocery lists to diary entries. The best gift you can get for your writer is a new copy of whatever re-read book is falling to pieces.

 

2. Your writer can be burned out, or even exhausted.

Credit: Magnus Brath, flickr.com
Credit: Magnus Brath, flickr.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sympathy’s good. Hot chocolate is better.

 

1. Sending out a manuscript feels like this. Be kind.

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Photo: Roo Reynolds, flickr.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please don’t say, “What’s the big deal? They’ll either say yes or no.” Or, “What are you so nervous about?”

 

Writers, what else do you wish others knew about you? Share in the comments.