Grammar Gripes? 4 Great Grammar Sites for Reference, Ranting

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original photo credit: Lin Pernille Photography, LLC (flickr.com CC 2.0)

If straight-writing blogs (like this one) are fun, the blogs that focus on grammar are pure catharsis. As part of my effort to kill the phrase “Grammar Nazi,” here are four of the absolute best, most grammariffic sites on the Web.

Scratch the itch, fellow word-nerds.

The Grammar section of Daily Writing Tips

Why it’s awesome: Daily Writing Tips’ Grammar section not only answers basic (and some not-so-basic) grammar questions, it also discusses some of the larger grammar issues that often get bandied about in writing circles, such as, “Can Grammar Be Taught?” and “Why Is Advertising So Hostile to Hyphens?

WriteAtHome (on Facebook)

Why it’s awesome: A delightful and challenging addition to your Facebook feed, WriteAtHome is a site for all technical aspects of writing, and if you succeed at WriteAtHome’s Daily Grammar Challenges, you’ll feel smart all day (trust me).

The Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab) Grammar Section

Why it’s awesome: The OWL is no-nonsense grammar help that you can easily point and link to when you get into inevitable arguments over the merits of “over” versus “more than” and other English weirdness.

Grammar Girl

Why it’s awesome: If you don’t know Mignon Fogarty (the Grammar Girl), on the site quickanddirtytips.com/grammar-girl, you haven’t been on the Internet long enough. Not only does she offer some of the best grammar explanations on the Internet, she also addresses many of the stylistic debates writers and editors (and only writers and editors) fret over, like “Preventive versus Preventative.” Grammar Girl is the place you go when you want to settle language arguments, develop style sheets or simply sound smart. Her Twitter account, @GrammarGirl, is also full of great stuff.

Bonus:

Now that I’m thinking about Twitter, here’s a friendly nudge to also follow @MadamGrammar, a fellow word nerd and talented Twitter ranter.

What grammar and editing sites should also be on this list? Share in the comments (if there are enough, I’ll post them in a part #2 with credit where credit’s due).

  • Martha Moffett

    Very useful blog, plus it led me to “Top 25 Writing Blogs 2014,” which led me to buying Nathan Bransford’s book on novel-writing. Chris Weston turned me on to your blog–Thanks, Chris. www,marthaspencil.com

    • http://www.theprocrastiwriter.com/ Shan

      Hi Martha, let me know what you think about Nathan’s book – I’m considering buying it, myself. Thanks for reading!

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